Tools

This is where you'll find all kinds of handy tools to help you work with DivX video. Tools are organized by the technologies we support, so choose from the list below to start downloading related tools. Remember to check out the documentation section if you need help.

HEVC Tools

HEVC video support is coming soon to DivX software, and this is where we'll publish our beta tools so you can be among the first to create and play DivX HEVC video in HD and 4K resolutions.

Stay tuned for upcoming releases and remember, we want to hear what you think.

DivX 10.1 Beta: 4K for the Masses

Who said bigger isn’t better? At four times the resolution of 1080p, 4K video packs in more pixels horizontally and vertically to deliver better picture quality. 4K really shines on displays sized 60” (152 cm) and above, but in 4K even on-screen text is noticeably smoother and sharper—even when you have a TV that doesn’t make your garage door feel small.

  • Download DivX 10.1 4K Beta Now (for Windows or Mac)

The next chapter in DivX software is here, and we’re excited to bring you this early preview. If you’ve tried the new HEVC profiles in DivX 10, you’re going to want DivX 10.1 Beta featuring DivX HEVC video playback and conversion up to 4K. Download using the link above now.

4K Video Showcase

Visit the DivX HEVC Showcase for 4K sample content. With DivX Web Player already installed, clicking a 4K video will start playback in your browser.

You may also download the 4K video for offline playback in DivX Player. Simply wait for it to buffer completely, then click the download icon, or right click and choose “Save video as.”

If you have native 4K footage for further testing and demonstrations, please drop us a line in the DivX HEVC Community Forum.

Release Notes

  • To ensure HEVC support, you must check "enable DivX HEVC Plug-in" during installation
  • See DivX HEVC Encoder and Decoder Performance table for average frames-per-second metrics
  • DivX 10.1 Beta release includes updated HEVC encoder and decoder libraries optimized for 4K creation and playback
  • DivX HEVC 4K UHD (Ultra HD) profile has been added to DivX Converter
  • Full support for multi-subtitle and multi-audio tracks
  • Compliant with DivX HEVC 4K Profile specs

When you're done, share your feedback. We look forward to hearing what you think!

DivX HEVC Community Encoder

DivX HEVC Team is excited to announce an updated version of our command line encoder for HEVC!

Download executable (Windows and Linux):

Instructions: using the DivX HEVC Encoder.

About:

This tool will allow you to encode HEVC streams that are within DivX HEVC profile. After encoding, you can mux video using MKVToolnix patched for HEVC or use the most recent version of MKVToolnix HEVC, and play the resulting container files back on your computer using DivX 10 player

Some reference HEVC streams can also be found here.

For simpler encoding with less control over the options try our DivX Converter, which supports HEVC encoding up to 4K.

DivX HEVC temporal scalability

DivX265 version 1.5 can create dual frame rate streams. For example, it can create 4K60/30 dual layer streams which can be played back on DivX HEVC 4K Certified devices that support 60Hz or 30 Hz. This makes it possible to play 4K@60 content on DivX HEVC file-based certified devices that cannot meet the playback requirements for 4K@60. It requires a mux which puts the DivX Tag (unregistered userdata) in "Codec Private". For example the DivX MKV mux from github will do this. The DivX Tag contains a random asset number and layer specific details.

Performance data

Evaluation of DivX265 v 1.5

Release Notes

  • DivX265 version 1.5
  • What's new:

      Supports DivX HEVC temporal scalability.
      New options:
      -ts, --temporal-scalability Enable two layer temporal scalability, where the frame rate of the baselayer is reduced by 2

    Known issues:

      Statistics Linux version incorrect.
      32 bit version cannot encode main 10 at 4K resolutions, use 64 bit version.
  • DivX265 version 1.4
  • What's new:

      Support for Main 10 (10 bit) in addition to Main (8 bit).
      Additional 10 bit raw input formats (yuv420p10le, v210)
      Improved encoding speed and efficiency
      Linux version
      Signalling of BT.2020
      New options:
      -10 --main10 Selects Main 10 (10 bit) profile
      --format (yuv420p, yuv420p10le, yuv422p10le, I420, V210) Raw pixelformat
      --psnr Calculation psnr metrics

    Known issues:

      Statistics Linux version incorrect.
      32 bit version cannot encode main 10 at 4K resolutions, use 64 bit version.

    It is recommended to use the 32 bit version with AviSynth.

    As always, please visit our forums and tell us what you think.

    DivX 10 Preview: HEVC Streaming in DivX Web Player

    DivX Web Player, or more affectionately known as "DWP", delivers a high-quality DivX video playback experience in your browser. With this preview of DWP that will be launched as part of DivX 10, HEVC MKV video up to 1080p is streamed efficiently to DWP, giving you more for less. Here's a sneak peak of what's to come. Note: if you don't already have the DivX HEVC plugins installed, follow the instructions for Windows and Mac below.

    DWP in Action


    Click to play DivX HEVC 1080p version
    Click to play DivX HEVC 720p version

    Installing HEVC Plugin for DivX Web Player

    Prerequisite: Install the latest DivX Web Player (v2.4) for Windows or Mac from DivX Bundle 9.1.3

    Instructions for Windows

    • Download and extract the DivX Web Player HEVC Plugin for Windows. It will contain:
      • DivXHEVCDecode.dll
      • DivXHEVCDecode.xml
      • DMFContainer.dll
      • DMFContainer.xml
    • Copy the contents of the zip file into directory C:\Program Files (x86)\DivX\DivX Plus Web Player\StreamEngine
    • Reload your browser

    Instructions for Mac OS

    • Download and extract the DivX Web Player HEVC Plugin for Mac. It will contain:
      • WebPlayerHEVC.pkg
    • Launch WebPlayerHEVC.pkg and follow the steps to install.
    • Reload your browser

    Notes: This release includes HM-11.0 compliant HEVC decoder plugins for DivX Web Player 2.4. We've tested using Tears of Steel and confirmed real time 1080p playback on a 4-Core i5 with 4GB RAM with content.

    When you're done, share your feedback. We look forward to hearing what you think!

    Uninstalling HEVC Plugin for DivX Web Player

    You may run the DivX Bundle 9.1.3 installer again, or...

    • Navigate to C:\Program Files (x86)\DivX\DivX Plus Web Player\StreamEngine directory
    • Delete these files:
    • DivXHEVCDecode.dll
    • DivXHEVCDecode.xml



    DivX HEVC Community Decoder

    The DivX HEVC Decoder release marks an important step on the path to delivering comprehensive HEVC video support to the DivX Community. Following the release of the DivX HEVC video profiles and our DivX HEVC Muxer, we’re proud to release the HEVC Plugin for DivX Player 9.1.3. Now you can playback the DivX HEVC streams (up to 1080p) with AAC audio you muxed into MKV.

    Note that this release is for Windows and Mac, and supports real-time playback up to 1080p on a relatively recent PC. We support the features for the HM-11.0 reference encoder’s random access main configuration, including Asymmetric Motion Partitions, Transform Skip, and Sample Adaptive Offset. We also added seeking capability, as well as improved speed and performance enhancements.

    Ready to decode?

    We hope you’ll give our decoder a whirl, and then share your feedback. We want to know what you think about the quality and also what it'll take to get you to make the switch to HEVC.

    Up next is the DivX HEVC Encoder. Stay tuned…

    DivX HEVC Video Showcase

    Tears of Steel is a short film by the Blender Institute. We've encoded some streams using the HM Reference Encoder for you to test, and included the muxed MKV versions we created as well. Please do not try to play HEVC streams in DivX Player, only the MKVs. NOTE: Most media players don't yet support HEVC and will not playback these videos, but DivX Player will;)

    Tears of Steel (Full Length)

    The Tears of Steel streams were encoded with HM-11.0 Reference Encoder using the encoder_randomaccess_main.cfg with Sample Adaptive Offset (SAO) disabled and WaveFrontSynchro enabled. (WaveFrontSynchro=1 --SAO=0). These were created along with an audio file for testing out the DivX HEVC (beta) Muxer. The 720p and 1080p MKVs outputted (below) will play in the latest DivX Player (just check "Enable DivX HEVC Plug-in" during installation); the HEVC streams will not.

    Muxed Files (MKVs)

    Video Stream Audio Stream File Size MKVMerge Version Download
    (right click, save as)
    DivX HEVC 1080p AAC LC 5.1 157 MB Promise Land Rovi v1.0.4 LINK
    DivX HEVC 720p AAC LC 5.1 101 MB Promise Land Rovi v1.0.4 LINK

    Video Streams

    HEVC Video Profile File Size Resolution Format Bitrate QP Avg. PSNR Download
    (right click, save as)
    DivX HEVC 1080p 128 MB 1920x1080 HEVC Annex B Stream 1474 kbps 27 42.29 LINK
    DivX HEVC 720p 72.7 MB 1280x720 HEVC Annex B Stream 831 kbps 27 41.65 LINK

    Audio Streams

    Format File Size Sample Rate Channels Download
    (right click, save as)
    AAC LC 28.8MB 48kHz 5.1 LINK


    Tears of Steel Image Slideshow
    (Click to enlarge)

    Download our streams, the HEVC Decoder and the HEVC mux tools, follow our instructions for Using MKVToolNix and don't forget to let us know how it all works out.

    Muxing DivX HEVC in MKV

    Last updated on Tues, 03/04/2014 by Geno James

    The folks at MKVToolNix have officially merged the changes submitted by DivX to add HEVC support to MKVToolNix. The latest version of MKVToolNix (v6.8) includes these changes.

    No more custom builds and playing with custom binaries, download the official MKVToolNix binaries/installers (v6.8 or later) and mux/demux HEVC video to/from mkv container to your hearts content.

    MKVToolNix is a popular set of open source tools used to mux and demux Matroska (mkv) files. The tools used to support AVC, VP8, VC1, and now, with the DivX team's latest contribution -- HEVC!

    All set? Now head over to the HEVC Documentation section to learn about Using MKVToolNix to mux your first DivX HEVC video. And while you're at it, don't forget to review the DivX HEVC profiles. As always, we welcome your feedback.

    H.264 Tools

    A few years ago, we launched DivX Plus HD, our video profile based on the H.264 standard. The profile is now supported in DivX Converter and DivX Player, DivX Certified devices, and forms the foundation of our DivX Plus Streaming technology.

    The list below includes our early beta tools for video encoding, audio encoding, muxing into MKV, and more.

    Create DivX Files

    Listed here are the tools you need to create DivX® and DivX Plus™ files. You'll also find loads of information and forums where you can share tips and tricks on getting your files to come out just the way you like.

    Welcome and happy encoding!

    DivX Plus Converter

    Your free download of DivX Plus Software includes DivX Plus Converter, which converts video files to DivX in one easy step, and now supports the new DivX Plus HD profile, which converts your HD video to H.264 (.mkv) with AAC audio.

    DivX MKV Mux

    The DivXMKVMux is a reference muxer that introduces DivX Plus MKV extensions like World Fonts and Smooth FF/RW.

    DivX H.264 Encoder

    This multithreaded command-line encoder produces high definition H.264 video bitstreams that are compatible with the DivX Plus HD H.264 video profile.

    DivX AAC Encoder

    This free command-line application that will encode uncompressed mono, stereo, or 5.1 surround audio compatible with the DivX Plus HD profile.

    DivX Codec 6.8 (.divx)

    DivX 6.8 introduces custom quantization matrices as an option in the encoder when using either of the HD profiles or unconstrained mode.

    Other Tools on DivX Labs

    Most of these tools come from collaboration between users of the DivX community, so you may find some new friends here as well.

    DivX AAC Encoder (Beta)

    DivX Plus adds the capability for high quality surround sound audio to the DivX ecosystem using Advanced Audio Coding (AAC) technology. When combined in an MKV container with H.264 video at up to 1080p, AAC audio completes a truly cinematic viewing experience. To support the creation of AAC tracks for DivX Plus HD content we've created a command line AAC audio encoder. Read on for more information and to access the download!

    About the DivX Plus HD AAC Encoder

    The DivX Plus HD AAC encoder is a command line application that will encode uncompressed mono, stereo, or 5.1 surround audio compatible with the DivX Plus HD profile. It accepts as input multichannel WAV files or raw PCM streams and supports encoding Low Complexity (LC) streams including High Efficiency v1 (HEv1) and High Efficiency (HEv2) modes. The AAC encoded stream is ADTS-encapsulated and can be easily muxed into an MKV file along with the accompanying video using MKVMerge, which we discussed previously in our H.264 encoding tutorial.

    Using the DivX Plus HD AAC Encoder

    After installing the encoder you can open a command console using the shortcut created in your Start menu. Type divxaacenc --help to see the list of the available command line arguments. If you aren't very familiar with using the command interpreter a short introduction is included in our H.264 encoding tutorial that will help get you started. You can also find help in the DivX Plus forum (requires sign-in).



    (Click to enlarge)

    The most basic form of the command line requires only two options, the name of the input and output files specified using -i and -o respectively:

    DivXAACEnc -i "MyInput.wav" -o "MyOutput.aac"

    • Input types

      The easiest input format for the encoder is a WAV audio file. This format has near universal support among audio editors for import and export and the file header includes information about the audio sampling rate, number of channels, and bits per sample so that there is no need to manually provide this information. The encoder expects the channels to be interleaved in order of Front Left (FL), Front Right (FR), Front Center (FC), Low Frequency Effects (LFE), Side Left (SR), Side Right (SR). Although internally WAV files are limited to storing only 4GB of data some applications will write larger files and the encoder will attempt to handle these automatically.

      You can also pass a raw PCM audio file to the encoder. The same channel order is expected and in addition you need to provide the correct sample rate, number of channels, and bits per sample because raw PCM files have no header that provides this information. This is done using the -s, -c, and -l arguments respectively. For example, to encode a 5.1 surround track using raw PCM input at 44.1Khz, 24-bit, you would enter:

      DivXAACEnc -i "MyInput.pcm" -o "MyOutput.aac" -s 44100 -c 6 -l 24

      The encoder expects raw PCM data to be in one of the following formats depending on bits per sample:

      Bits per sample PCM format
      8 Unsigned most significant bit first, interleaved by channel
      16 Signed little endian most significant bit first, interleaved by channel
      24 Signed little endian most significant bit first, interleaved by channel

      Warning: Using an incompatible PCM format or entering the wrong format information can result in loud noise in the output file. Minimize your volume when you first try playing a file!

    • Rate control

      The encoder has two rate control options: Constant Bitrate (CBR) and Variable Bitrate (VBR). CBR is the default mode and allows you to specify how many kilobits per second the encoder can spend when encoding. Higher bitrates will lead to better quality but larger files. The rate is passed using the -b argument and valid rates include (in kbps): 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32, 40, 48, 56, 64, 80, 96, 112, 128, 160, 192, 224, 256, 320, 384, 448, 512, 640, 768, 896, 1024. For example to encode an input file at 128kbps:

      DivXAACEnc -i "MyInput.wav" -o "MyOutput.aac" -b 128

      The maximum data rates depend on the input sample rate, number of channels, and which if any high efficiency mode is enabled (more on that in a moment!).

      Maximum bitrates for LC mode (kbps)

      Sample rate Mono Stereo Surround
      96000 512 1024 n/a
      88200 512 1024 n/a
      64000 384 768 n/a
      48000 256 512 1024
      44100 256 512 1024
      32000 192 384 1024
      24000 128 256 768
      22050 128 256 768
      16000 96 192 512
      12000 64 128 384
      11025 64 128 384
      8000 48 96 256

      Bitrates for HEv1 mode (kbps)

      Sample rate Mono Stereo Surround
      16000 10 - 40 16 - 56 48 - 128
      22050 10 - 48 16 - 64 48 - 160
      24000 10 - 48 16 - 64 48 - 160
      32000 16 - 56 24 - 80 80 - 192
      44100 16 - 64 32 - 96 96 - 256
      48000 16 - 64 32 - 96 96 - 256

      Bitrates for HEv2 mode (kbps)

      Sample rate Stereo
      16000 10 - 40
      22050 10 - 48
      24000 10 - 48
      32000 16 - 56
      44100 16 - 64
      48000 16 - 64

      VBR encoding takes an alternative approach to rate control and instead of specifying a constant bitrate you indicate a target quality. The encoder will spend as many bits as necessary to achieve the target quality and thus this mode is suitable only when you don't need to know in advance the output file size. VBR modes are enabled by passing -v with a value in the range 1-9, higher values giving better quality but larger files. For example:

      DivXAACEnc -i "MyInput.wav" -o "MyOutput.aac" -v 4

    • High Efficiency Modes

      The encoder includes support for two high-efficiency modes, HEv1 and HEv2. These modes are designed to improve perceptual quality at very low bitrates and are disabled by default so that the encoder provides the best possible quality for typical projects. Enabling either mode limits the sample rates, channel configurations, and range of permitted data rates the encoder will accept. When any high-efficiency mode is enabled only the CBR rate control mode can be used.

      HEv1 mode enables Spectral Band Replication (SBR), where high frequencies are not coded but instead ancillary information is used to aid decoders in later synthesizing similar sounds during playback. At low data rates the synthesized audio does not match the original input but the perceptual quality will be better than if the encoder had attempted to represent all frequencies accurately with too little bandwidth. To enable HEv1 mode use -e 1, for example:

      DivXAACEnc -i "MyInput.wav" -o "MyOutput.aac" -e 1 -b 64

      HEv2 mode additionally enables Parametric Stereo (PS), where the encoder reduces a stereo input to mono while recording ancillary data that allows a decoder to simulate a stereo environment during playback that approximates the original. This improves perceptual quality at extremely low data rates where encoding a true stereo sound with sufficient quality is not possible given the available bandwidth. To enable HEv2 mode use -e 2, for example:

      DivXAACEnc -i "MyInput.wav" -o "MyOutput.aac" -e 2 -b 40

      It's important to note that MKVMerge cannot detect whether SBR is present in an AAC audio stream. Therefore, when using either HEv1 or HEv2 always inform MKVMerge that SBR is present using --aac-is-sbr. For example:

      MKVMerge -o "MyFilm.mkv" --default-duration 0:1/24s "MyVideo.264" --aac-is-sbr 0:1 "MyAudio.aac"

      The high-efficiency modes introduce a coding delay, so when they are later decoded audio will begin slightly later than the absolute beginning of the file. The delay times will be:

      Coding delay by mode (milliseconds)

      Sample rate HEv1 HEv2
      48000 22 40
      44100 24 43
      32000 33 60
      24000 44 80
      22050 48 87
      16000 66 120

      This delay is normally corrected for during muxing. For example, when muxing a 22050hz AAC HEv1 stream with MKVMerge you might use:

      MKVMerge -o "MyFilm.mkv" --default-duration 0:1/24s "MyVideo.264" --sync 0:-48 --aac-is-sbr 0:1 "MyAudio.aac"

    • ADTS protection

      The DivX Plus HD AAC encoder can optionally write CRC values to the ADTS container that allow a decoder to detect errors later introduced in the audio bitstream. This feature can be enabled using the -p argument:

      DivXAACEnc -i "MyInput.wav" -o "MyOutput.aac" -p 1

      The CRC will use approximately 0.1 - 1.5kbps for sample rates in the range 8Khz to 96Khz respectively.

    • Low-pass filter

      The encoder automatically applies a low-pass filter to remove some of the high frequencies from the input signal depending on the encoding bitrate. By reducing the number of bits spent on high frequencies when the bitrate is lowered the overall perceptual quality of the sound is better maintained. The cut-off frequency for the low-pass filter can be manually specified using -f. For example, to cut frequencies above 16Khz:

      DivXAACEnc -i "MyInput.wav" -o "MyOutput.aac" -f 16000

      The range of frequencies represented in an input file is limited to half the sample rate, therefore if your input file has a sample rate of 48Khz the highest frequencies in the audio are 24Khz, and setting the low-pass filter higher than this will have no effect. The low-pass filter can be disabled using -f 0, but this is only recommended at high bitrates.

     

    Audio processing tips

    • Audacity is a handy, free audio-editor that can perform various operations on uncompressed audio files.

    • Sources with one file per channel can be combined into a single WAV file using a tool such as Microsoft's wavavimux utility. This tool will install under \Program Files\Windows Media Components\Tools\WAVAVIMUX by default. To convert 6 individual WAV files into one multi-channel wav you would use:

      wavavimux -o "multichannel.avi" -iwav 6 "FL.wav" "FR.wav" "C.wav" "LFE.wav" "SL.wav" "SR.wav" -mask 63

     

    Known issues for DivX Plus HD AAC Encoder Beta 1

    The following are known issues in this version:

    • The CBR mode does not pad frames if the input audio complexity does not require using all of the available bitrate.

    • The AAC encoder outputs error messages to stdout rather than stderr.

    • The low-pass filter cut-off frequency does not automatically adjust for sample rates greater than 48Khz. Therefore, when encoding input files with sample rates in the range 64Khz-96Khz set the cut-off frequency manually using the -f argument.

    • The default bitrate for 6-channel input may be too low. Specify a rate using the -b argument.

     

    Downloading DivX Plus HD AAC Encoder Beta 1

    To download this beta you need to create a free DivX Labs account then join the Project Rémoulade Apps group. Downloads for Project Rémoulade are available at the top of the group homepage for signed-in members.

     

    How you can help us

    We want to hear your feedback! Please submit your comments and questions to the DivX Plus forum (requires sign-in).

     

    If your feedback relates to performance issues or software stability, please consider attaching some of the following to your post:

    • Screenshots from CPU-Z that show your CPU, memory and mainboard configuration.

    • Screenshots of any crash dialogs, including the details view if available.

    • An export from MSInfo32, which you can launch by simply typing MSInfo32 into the Run box on your Start menu, so that we can see information about the operating system, running software and application errors.

    DivX AAC Encoder Beta 1

    DivX Plus adds the capability for high quality surround sound audio to the DivX ecosystem using Advanced Audio Coding (AAC) technology. When combined in an MKV container with H.264 video at up to 1080p, AAC audio completes a truly cinematic viewing experience. To support the creation of AAC tracks for DivX Plus HD content we've created a command line AAC audio encoder. Read on for more information and to access the download!



    About the DivX Plus HD AAC Encoder

    The DivX Plus HD AAC encoder is a command line application that will encode uncompressed mono, stereo, or 5.1 surround audio compatible with the DivX Plus HD profile. It accepts as input multichannel WAV files or raw PCM streams and supports encoding Low Complexity (LC) streams including High Efficiency v1 (HEv1) and High Efficiency (HEv2) modes. The AAC encoded stream is ADTS-encapsulated and can be easily muxed into an MKV file along with the accompanying video using MKVMerge, which we discussed previously in our H.264 encoding tutorial.


    Using the DivX Plus HD AAC Encoder

    After installing the encoder you can open a command console using the shortcut created in your Start menu. Type divxaacenc --help to see the list of the available command line arguments. If you aren't very familiar with using the command interpreter a short introduction is included in our H.264 encoding tutorial that will help get you started. You can also find help in the DivX Plus forum (requires sign-in).



    (Click to enlarge)

    The most basic form of the command line requires only two options, the name of the input and output files specified using -i and -o respectively:

    DivXAACEnc -i "MyInput.wav" -o "MyOutput.aac"

    • Input types

      The easiest input format for the encoder is a WAV audio file. This format has near universal support among audio editors for import and export and the file header includes information about the audio sampling rate, number of channels, and bits per sample so that there is no need to manually provide this information. The encoder expects the channels to be interleaved in order of Front Left (FL), Front Right (FR), Front Center (FC), Low Frequency Effects (LFE), Side Left (SR), Side Right (SR). Although internally WAV files are limited to storing only 4GB of data some applications will write larger files and the encoder will attempt to handle these automatically.

      You can also pass a raw PCM audio file to the encoder. The same channel order is expected and in addition you need to provide the correct sample rate, number of channels, and bits per sample because raw PCM files have no header that provides this information. This is done using the -s, -c, and -l arguments respectively. For example, to encode a 5.1 surround track using raw PCM input at 44.1Khz, 24-bit, you would enter:

      DivXAACEnc -i "MyInput.pcm" -o "MyOutput.aac" -s 44100 -c 6 -l 24

      The encoder expects raw PCM data to be in one of the following formats depending on bits per sample:

      Bits per sample PCM format
      8 Unsigned most significant bit first, interleaved by channel
      16 Signed little endian most significant bit first, interleaved by channel
      24 Signed little endian most significant bit first, interleaved by channel

      Warning: Using an incompatible PCM format or entering the wrong format information can result in loud noise in the output file. Minimize your volume when you first try playing a file!

    • Rate control

      The encoder has two rate control options: Constant Bitrate (CBR) and Variable Bitrate (VBR). CBR is the default mode and allows you to specify how many kilobits per second the encoder can spend when encoding. Higher bitrates will lead to better quality but larger files. The rate is passed using the -b argument and valid rates include (in kbps): 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32, 40, 48, 56, 64, 80, 96, 112, 128, 160, 192, 224, 256, 320, 384, 448, 512, 640, 768, 896, 1024. For example to encode an input file at 128kbps:

      DivXAACEnc -i "MyInput.wav" -o "MyOutput.aac" -b 128

      The maximum data rates depend on the input sample rate, number of channels, and which if any high efficiency mode is enabled (more on that in a moment!).

      Maximum bitrates for LC mode (kbps)

      Sample rate Mono Stereo Surround
      48000 256 512 1024
      44100 256 512 1024
      32000 192 384 1024
      24000 128 256 768
      22050 128 256 768
      16000 96 192 512
      12000 64 128 384
      11025 64 128 384
      8000 48 96 256

      Bitrates for HEv1 mode (kbps)

      Sample rate Mono Stereo Surround
      16000 10 - 40 16 - 56 48 - 128
      22050 10 - 48 16 - 64 48 - 160
      24000 10 - 48 16 - 64 48 - 160
      32000 16 - 56 24 - 80 80 - 192
      44100 16 - 64 32 - 96 96 - 256
      48000 16 - 64 32 - 96 96 - 256

      Bitrates for HEv2 mode (kbps)

      Sample rate Stereo
      16000 10 - 40
      22050 10 - 48
      24000 10 - 48
      32000 16 - 56
      44100 16 - 64
      48000 16 - 64

      VBR encoding takes an alternative approach to rate control and instead of specifying a constant bitrate you indicate a target quality. The encoder will spend as many bits as necessary to achieve the target quality and thus this mode is suitable only when you don't need to know in advance the output file size. VBR modes are enabled by passing -v with a value in the range 1-9, higher values giving better quality but larger files. For example:

      DivXAACEnc -i "MyInput.wav" -o "MyOutput.aac" -v 4

    • High Efficiency Modes

      The encoder includes support for two high-efficiency modes, HEv1 and HEv2. These modes are designed to improve perceptual quality at very low bitrates and are disabled by default so that the encoder provides the best possible quality for typical projects. Enabling either mode limits the sample rates, channel configurations, and range of permitted data rates the encoder will accept. When any high-efficiency mode is enabled only the CBR rate control mode can be used.

      HEv1 mode enables Spectral Band Replication (SBR), where high frequencies are not coded but instead ancillary information is used to aid decoders in later synthesizing similar sounds during playback. At low data rates the synthesized audio does not match the original input but the perceptual quality will be better than if the encoder had attempted to represent all frequencies accurately with too little bandwidth. To enable HEv1 mode use -e 1, for example:

      DivXAACEnc -i "MyInput.wav" -o "MyOutput.aac" -e 1 -b 64

      HEv2 mode additionally enables Parametric Stereo (PS), where the encoder reduces a stereo input to mono while recording ancillary data that allows a decoder to simulate a stereo environment during playback that approximates the original. This improves perceptual quality at extremely low data rates where encoding a true stereo sound with sufficient quality is not possible given the available bandwidth. To enable HEv2 mode use -e 2, for example:

      DivXAACEnc -i "MyInput.wav" -o "MyOutput.aac" -e 2 -b 40

      It's important to note that MKVMerge cannot detect whether SBR is present in an AAC audio stream. Therefore, when using either HEv1 or HEv2 always inform MKVMerge that SBR is present using --aac-is-sbr. For example:

      MKVMerge -o "MyFilm.mkv" --default-duration 0:1/24s "MyVideo.264" --aac-is-sbr 0:1 "MyAudio.aac"

      The high-efficiency modes introduce a coding delay, so when they are later decoded audio will begin slightly later than the absolute beginning of the file. The delay times will be:

      Coding delay by mode (milliseconds)

      Sample rate HEv1 HEv2
      48000 22 40
      44100 24 43
      32000 33 60
      24000 44 80
      22050 48 87
      16000 66 120

      This delay is normally corrected for during muxing. For example, when muxing a 22050hz AAC HEv1 stream with MKVMerge you might use:

      MKVMerge -o "MyFilm.mkv" --default-duration 0:1/24s "MyVideo.264" --sync 0:-48 --aac-is-sbr 0:1 "MyAudio.aac"

    • ADTS protection

      The DivX Plus HD AAC encoder can optionally write CRC values to the ADTS container that allow a decoder to detect errors later introduced in the audio bitstream. This feature can be enabled using the -p argument:

      DivXAACEnc -i "MyInput.wav" -o "MyOutput.aac" -p 1

      The CRC will use approximately 0.125 - 0.750kbps for sample rates in the range 8Khz to 48Khz respectively.

    • Low-pass filter

      The encoder automatically applies a low-pass filter to remove some of the high frequencies from the input signal depending on the encoding bitrate. By reducing the number of bits spent on high frequencies when the bitrate is lowered the overall perceptual quality of the sound is better maintained. The cut-off frequency for the low-pass filter can be manually specified using -f. For example, to cut frequencies above 16Khz:

      DivXAACEnc -i "MyInput.wav" -o "MyOutput.aac" -f 16000

      The range of frequencies represented in an input file is limited to half the sample rate, therefore if your input file has a sample rate of 48Khz the highest frequencies in the audio are 24Khz, and setting the low-pass filter higher than this will have no effect. The low-pass filter can be disabled using -f 0, but this is only recommended at high bitrates.

    Audio processing tips

    • Audacity is a handy, free audio-editor that can perform various operations on uncompressed audio files.

    • Sources with one file per channel can be combined into a single WAV file using a tool such as Microsoft's wavavimux utility. This tool will install under \Program Files\Windows Media Components\Tools\WAVAVIMUX by default. To convert 6 individual WAV files into one multi-channel wav you would use:

      wavavimux -o "multichannel.avi" -iwav 6 "FL.wav" "FR.wav" "C.wav" "LFE.wav" "SL.wav" "SR.wav" -mask 63

    Known issues for DivX Plus HD AAC Encoder Beta 1

    The following are known issues in this version:

    • The CBR mode does not pad frames if the input audio complexity does not require using all of the available bitrate.

    • The AAC encoder outputs error messages to stdout rather than stderr.

    • The low-pass filter cut-off frequency does not automatically adjust for sample rates greater than 48Khz.

    • The default bitrate for 6-channel input may be too low. Specify a rate using the -b argument.

    Downloading DivX Plus HD AAC Encoder Beta 1

    To download this beta you need to create a free DivX Labs account then join the Project Rémoulade Apps group. Downloads for Project Rémoulade are available at the top of the group homepage for signed-in members.


    How you can help us

    We want to hear your feedback! Please submit your comments and questions to the DivX Plus forum (requires sign-in).


    If your feedback relates to performance issues or software stability, please consider attaching some of the following to your post:

    • Screenshots from CPU-Z that show your CPU, memory and mainboard configuration.

    • Screenshots of any crash dialogs, including the details view if available.

    • An export from MSInfo32, which you can launch by simply typing MSInfo32 into the Run box on your Start menu, so that we can see information about the operating system, running software and application errors.

    DivX H.264 Encoder (Beta)

    The DivX H.264 Encoder is a sample tool for DivX Plus HD video encoding. It creates DivX Plus HD-compliant H.264 bitstreams that can be used in DivX Plus MKV files or as a compatibility reference.

    In response to your feedback after our Beta 1 release we've been working on the DivX Plus HD H.264 command line encoder, and in the first of several updates we are introducing several popularly requested features. These include a target quality mode, support for flagging sample aspect ratio, and support for input via stdin. Read on for more information!

    What's new in Beta 2

    • Target Quality Mode

      One of the problems faced in video compression is determining at which data rate we need to encode a given piece of content to achieve a particular output quality. Certain sources are likely to require higher bitrates than others, e.g. a fast-action film versus a CGI animation, and experimental encoding can be time consuming, exacerbated by the fact that the rate-control can be misguided with less than 2 passes. A target quality mode can help solve this problem.

      As an alternative to the 1-pass (-br) and n-pass (-br -npass) bitrate-based modes that we described in our last tutorial you can now enable a preliminary implementation of quality-based rate-control whose goal is to provide a consistent perceived output quality across a wide variety of input material without exceeding data rate constraints for playback devices. By using the new -qf <int> argument you can specify a target quality in the range 0-51, with lower numbers implying a higher target quality, e.g.:

      DivX264 -i "Input.avs" -o "Output.264" -qf 18

      This target quality mode is useful when you want to target a certain output quality from a single encoding pass and you are willing to let the encoder determine the necessary data rate instead of targeting a particular output file size. All other variables held constant, higher quality settings (lower -qf <int> values) will produce larger files and you will need to experiment a little to find the setting that best balances your personal preferences. The target quality mode can be leveraged for compression checks by GUI applications and should produce similar quality to a 2-pass encoding at the same effective rate but in much less time.


    • Sample Aspect Ratio

      Sample aspect ratio (also known as "pixel aspect ratio" in the DivX 6 encoder) is a method of informing the renderer that the pixels in each decoded picture buffer actually represent a sample of the original video whose shape was not necessarily square - i.e. that the renderer may need to rescale the decoded picture to be taller or wider before displaying it. The technique allows devices with constrained buffer shapes to handle pictures that are wider or taller than they would otherwise support. Examples include certain HD cameras as well as common formats such as DVD, where SAR is often used in conjunction with letterboxing or pillarboxing to ensure that videos with a variety of frame shape can be stored in high quality in a fixed-shape frame buffer.

      You can now specify the sample aspect ratio (SAR) of the input video using the -sar argument. In its alpha release the encoder always assumed that pixels were square (1:1 SAR) and thus it was necessary to resize certain source material to ensure this was actually true. Because these adjustments are no longer necessary it's possible to achieve better picture resolution and less pre-processing time in the input pipeline. These pictures demonstrate just one common use case for SAR:



      Widescreen picture formatted for PAL 720x576 16:9 DAR DVD, as encoded.
      (Click to enlarge and read more)



      The same picture after the renderer applies 16:11 SAR during playback.
      (Click to enlarge)


      If your input video does not have 1:1 SAR you need to specify the ratio of width to height of each sample that the renderer should display during playback. Note that the display aspect and sample aspect are two related but different properties. Some frequently encountered sample aspects are shown below:

      SD Format SAR
      PAL 4:3 12:11
      PAL 16:9 16:11
      NTSC 4:3 10:11
      NTSC 16:9 40:33

      The DivX Plus HD profile implements stricter rules for interlaced content to ensure robust playback on a wide variety of devices. When encoding interlaced material using the -tff or -bff arguments only the following combinations of resolution and SAR are permitted:
      Interlaced resolution Support SARs
      1920x1080i60 1:1 (16:9 frame)
      1920x1080i50 1:1 (16:9 frame)
      1440x1080i60 1:1 (4:3 frame), 4:3 (16:9 frame)
      1440x1080i50 1:1 (4:3 frame), 4:3 (16:9 frame)
      720x480i60 1:1, 40:33 (16:9 frame), 10:11 (4:3 frame)
      720x576i50 1:1, 16:11 (16:9 frame), 12:11 (4:3 frame)
      704x480i60 1:1, 40:33 (16:9 frame), 10:11 (4:3 frame)
      704x576i50 1:1, 16:11 (16:9 frame), 12:11 (4:3 frame)
      640x480i60 1:1 (4:3 frame)
      480x480i60 1:1, 20:11 (16:9 frame), 15:11 (4:3 frame)
      480x576i50 1:1, 24:11 (16:9 frame), 18:11 (4:3 frame)
      352x480i60 1:1, 80:33 (16:9 frame), 20:11 (4:3 frame)
      352x576i50 1:1, 32:11 (16:9 frame), 24:11 (4:3 frame)


    • Stdin support

      The encoder now accepts raw video input via stdin, which makes it both easier to develop around the encoder and to use a wider variety of tools in the input pipeline for encoding DivX Plus HD content. In our tutorial for the alpha version of the encoder we showed how to use AVISynth to read a source file in an arbitrary format, decode it, and perform some basic manipulations like resizing to a supported resolution and frame rate. These same operations can now be performed using other common video processing toolkits. Let's look at a typical example using FFmpeg.

      FFmpeg's documentation can appear a little daunting at first due to it's extensive functionality, but really it's not much more complex than the command line tools we've already encountered. The command line documentation tells us that the basic syntax looks like this:

      ffmpeg [[infile options][`-i' infile]]... {[outfile options] outfile}...

      We'll use a handful of the available options to input an AVI file, crop and resize it to a supported resolution, and output raw video at a valid frame rate ready to pipe into the DivX Plus HD encoder. Let's assume our input video is 1920x1088 @ 30fps progressive and we want to encode at 720p @ 23.976fps. We can tell FFmpeg to decode our AVI file using -i, crop 8 pixels from the height using -cropbottom, resize to 1280x720 using -s, and convert the frame rate using -r. The first part of the command line might look as follows:

      ffmpeg.exe -i "C:\SomeFolder\MyInput.avi" -cropbottom 8 -s 1280x720 -r 24000/1001

      We also need to use -f and -pix_fmt to tell FFmpeg that we want to output YV12 planar video (the raw format that the DivX Plus HD encoder expects via stdin), and to write those raw frames to stdout, which we will later pipe to the encoder's stdin. To do that we just put a "-" character where we'd normally write the output filename. This makes our complete command-line for FFmpeg look like this:

      ffmpeg.exe -i "C:\SomeFolder\MyInput.avi" -cropbottom 8 -s 1280x720 -r 24000/1001 -f rawvideo -pix_fmt yuv420p -

      Next we ask the DivX Plus HD encoder to read input via the stdin, again using the "-" character where we'd normally write a file name. Because the only data the encoder will see is raw video frames we also have to tell it the resolution and frame rate of the input video on the command line when using the stdin feature. Let's use the new target quality mode (-qf) in conjunction with the stdin feature to create a high quality file in just one pass:

      divx264.exe -i - -y 1280x720 -fps 24000/1001 -qf 18 -o "C:\SomeFolder\MyOutput.264"

      Neither of these commands will work on their own. We must combine them using the pipe character, "|" to pipe FFmpeg's stdout handle to the DivX Plus HD encoder's stdin handle:

      ffmpeg.exe -i "C:\SomeFolder\MyInput.avi" -cropbottom 8 -s 1280x720 -r 24000/1001 -f rawvideo -pix_fmt yuv420p - | divx264.exe -i - -y 1280x720 -fps 24000/1001 -qf 18 -o "C:\SomeFolder\MyOutput.264"

      When we execute this command FFmpeg will decode and transform the input video, and the DivX Plus HD encoder will output an H.264 video stream, all without creating any intermediary files. All that remains is to mux the video stream into an MKV container:

      MKVMerge.exe -o "C:\SomeFolder\MyMKVVideo.mkv" --default-duration 0:1001/24000s "C:\SomeFolder\MyOutput.264"



      Encoding using stdin then creating an MKV file.
      (Click to enlarge)


      Keep in mind that the encoder requires valid input resolution and frame rates as input. We covered these in our last tutorial, but for convenience here's the table once again:

      Rate
      (Numerator)
      Scale
      (Denominator)
      Approximate FPS
      = Rate / Scale
      Max Dimensions Min Dimensions
      60 1 60 1280x720 320x240
      60000 1001 59.940 1280x720 320x240
      50 1 50 1280x720 320x240
      30 1 30 1920x1080 320x240
      30000 1001 29.970 1920x1080 320x240
      25 1 25 1920x1080 320x240
      24 1 24 1920x1080 320x240
      24000 1001 23.976 1920x1080 320x240

      Width and height must each be multiples of 8.
      Width and height are tested independently for minimums and maximums.
      Any alternative rate/scale representations must evaluate to exact equivalents.


    • Input trimming

      A minor new feature is the ability to trim frames from the beginning of the input video using -start. In conjunction with the existing -frames argument it is possible to specify a range of frames to be encoded, which can be useful for conducting short tests as well as removing unwanted sequences from captured material. An example of using both features to encode only frames 1000 through 2999 is as follows:

      divx264.exe -i "MyInput.avs" -o "C:\SomeFolder\MyOutput.264" -qf 18 -start 1000 -frames 2000

      The -start argument currently works only with input from file because seeking is not possible when reading from stdin. When using stdin you should use options in the decoding application in place of -start and -frames, for example FFmpeg's -ss and -t arguments.

    • Ctrl+C, Ctrl+Break supported

      It's now possible to stop the encoder by pressing Ctrl+C or Ctrl+Break while it is running.

     

    Known issues for DivX Plus HD H.264 Encoder Beta 2

    The following are known issues in this version:

    • The encoder may run slowly with input that is in RGB colorspace. If you are using an AVISynth script for input add ConvertToYV12() to your script to convert video to YV12 colorspace.

    • The encoder doesn't support input from compressed AVI files. Create an AVISynth script using the AVISource filter to process such files.

    • The encoder will only accept 1:1 SAR for 704x576i and 704x480i input.

     

    Downloading DivX Plus HD H.264 Encoder Beta 2

    To download this beta you need to create a free DivX Labs account then join the Project Rémoulade Apps group. Downloads for Project Rémoulade are available at the top of the group homepage for signed-in members.

     

    How you can help us

    We want to hear your feedback! Please submit your comments and questions to the DivX Plus forum (requires sign-in).

     

    If your feedback relates to performance issues or software stability, please consider attaching some of the following to your post:

    • Screenshots from CPU-Z that show your CPU, memory and mainboard configuration.

    • Screenshots of any crash dialogs, including the details view if available.

    • An export from MSInfo32, which you can launch by simply typing MSInfo32 into the Run box on your Start menu, so that we can see information about the operating system, running software and application errors.

    DivX MKV Mux Beta 1

    DivX MKV Mux is a sample application designed to allow developers to experiment with DivX Plus .mkv advanced features like Smooth FF/RW and World Fonts. This software is provided as-is and is not intended as a substitute for other .mkv writers.

    Download the DivX MKV Mux Beta 1 installation package and check out the documentation.

    DivX Plus HD H.264 Encoder (Beta 2)

    In response to your feedback after our Beta 1 release we've been working on the DivX Plus HD H.264 command line encoder, and in the first of several updates we are introducing several popularly requested features. These include a target quality mode, support for flagging sample aspect ratio, and support for input via stdin. Read on for more information!

    Download the DivXH264Encoder Beta 2 installation package:

    MPEG-4 Tools

    Here's where you'll find legacy DivX MPEG-4 tools for content creation and playback.

    DivX Menu Builder

    DivX Menu Builder is a tool that helps you create menus for DivX files.

    This tool created is for the DivX community, by UserXP. Thank you UserXP, you made the world of menus a lot easier to deal with.

    Download (follow link to software download):

    DivX Mux GUI

    DivX Mux GUI is the perfect tool to correct asynchronous audio and video. You can use this tool to add different audio tracks or subtitle tracks to a video file. Audio tracks may also be of different formats, for example you can add one mp3 and ac3 track. Get the download from Kamiwa.

    DivX® Codec 6.8.2 Released!

    DivX Codec 6.8 Logo

    DivX Codec 6.8 introduced two major improvements over older versions - multithreaded decoding and support for custom quantization matrices. In addition, DivX Codec 6.8.2 will contain fixes for several issues reported to us since the 6.8 release, including better support for dual monitors and for older DivX files.


    Download DivX Codec 6.8.2


    Update

    This article has been updated to reflect the official release of DivX Codec 6.8.2 as part of the DivX for Windows bundle on the DivX.com website.


    Faster decoding

    DivX Codec has long featured multi-threading for improved performance on hyperthreaded, dual core or multi-processor systems, but we continue to optimize the codec further over time, and DivX 6.8 brought significant performance gains in the decoder.

    In the chart below, we took a full-frame PAL source and encoded it at quantizer 2 with I/P frames to represent a very high bitrate DivX file, and quantizer 6 with I/P/B frames to represent more commonly encountered DivX video. We then made some minor modifications to VirtualDub to record in miliseconds the average time required to decode these two bitstreams over three passes with all other non-critical processes closed on our test machine, a Dell Preceision M90 featuring the Intel Centrino Duo.

    Click to enlarge this chart

    The chart shows that in our test when we disabled post-processing and compared the time taken by DivX Codec 6.7 against DivX Codec 6.8.2 for the clip encoded at Q2, DivX Codec 6.8.2 performed 37% faster. DivX Codec 6.8.2 clearly outpaces 6.7 even when full deblocking with sharpening is enabled, the most taxing of all post-processing settings.


    Custom quantization matrices

    DivX 6.8 also introduced custom quantization matrices as an option in the encoder when using either of the HD profiles or unconstrained mode. Quantization matrices control the way information about the picture is subtly degraded as it undergoes parts of the lossy compression process. By loading different matrices you can influence how high and low frequency components of each block are adjusted, biasing data allocation towards flat or textured surfaces. This can lead to improved quality for certain types of content, such as anime, CGI, certain stylized works, and so on.

    DivX Codec can load both CQM and XCM format matrix files, so you can leverage a large volume of matrices already created by the digital video community (see link to "qmatrix.zip" in this thread at Doom9.org, for example). We really like LigH's Custom Quantization Matrix Editor, which lets you easily edit files in both of these formats and visualize the matrices in 3D. You can edit both the intraframe matrix (used for I-frames, or "key-frames") and the interframe matrix (used for P/B frames, or "delta-frames"). LigH's help file also explains quantization matrices in more technical detail, so be sure to check it out. Best of all, many older versions of the DivX decoder already load custom matrices, so you should not run into compatibility issues with this new feature.


    What's fixed in 6.8.2

    • When videos that have non-square aspect ratios are moved across dual monitors the aspect ratio is now correctly preserved.
    • It is now possible to play DivX 3.11 videos when "Use advanced hardware overlay" is enabled in the decoder configuration utility.
    • Custom quantization matrices containing the ASCII end-of-file character are now loaded correctly.
    • The "Browse Matrices" button in the encoder UI is now available consistently when the quantization type is set to "MPEG-2 Custom".
    • The codec should no longer output licensing messages to the console. Thanks to BitBasher over at Doom9.org for getting in touch about this problem!

    Downloading DivX Codec 6.8.2:

    DivX Codec 6.8.2 is part of the DivX for Windows package and can be installed on top of any prior version of DivX to update it. If you are a registered user of DivX 6 your registration will be retained if you choose to try this beta or if you choose to re-install the last official release of DivX for Windows.

    Sub2DivX

    This tool allows you to add up to 8 .srt or .idx/sub subtitles to an avi file and create a new .divx file containing these subtitles. Download! the tool.

    Web Player Tools

    HD video with true 5.1 channel surround sound, multiple subtitles and audio track support, smooth playback with hardware acceleration, and the ability to download everything you watch online. And with support for DIVX, AVI, MKV, MP4 and MOV, Web Player is a great choice to publish video to your website or blog. DivX Web Player now supports DivX Plus Streaming™ so you can enjoy purchased movies and TV shows without buffering right in your browser

    DivX Plus Web Player Code Generator

    The DivX Plus Web Code Generator allows you to create a small piece of code that can be inserted into your website to display and playback DivX/AVI and DivX Plus HD (MKV/H.264/AAC) videos via the DivX Plus Web Player.

    If you can copy and paste, you have enough know-how to stream a DivX video from your site. If you scoff at automatic HTML code generators, then our Web Developer Guide is for you.

    English | Deutsch | Français | 日本語 | Español

    Watch a sample implementation

    This page will generate the code that you can copy and paste to embed a DivX video into your web page or blog. Simply fill-in the blanks and hit the "Generate" button.

    URL to DivX/AVI or DivX Plus HD (MKV) video file:
    Video width: (in pixels)
    Video height: (in pixels)
    Video Thumbnail URL (PNG, JPG or GIF):
    Auto-Start playback


    After you have you have clicked the Generate button, click the Preview button and if you like what you see, simply copy/paste the code below to your web page.


    Web Player (1.4 and 1.5)

    For those of you using web sites that have not yet updated to the latest implementation of the DivX Plus Web Player by offering content in DivX Plus/MKV, we are providing the following previous installers.

    We are getting feedback from some of the most popular DivX video content sites as they roll out the new DivX Plus Web Player, but for anyone experiencing issues during these transitions, we are providing the following previous installer links to help get you by during the upgrade.

    Windows (DivX Web Player 1.5)
    Users of sites that exclusively offer DivX/AVI content can choose to continue using DivX Web Player 1.5. In the event that you have updated to 2.0 or participated in our beta and wish to return to using 1.5, you may use the following installer:
    http://download.divx.com/divx/oldversions/DivXWebPlayerInstallerv15.exe

    Mac OS (DivX Web Player 1.4)
    PowerPC owners or users of sites that exclusively offer DivX/AVI content can continue to use DivX Web Player 1.4 for Mac. In the event that you updated or participated in our 2.0 beta and wish to restore 1.4, you can use the following installer:
    http://download.divx.com/divx/oldversions/DivXWebPlayerMacv14.dmg

    DivX Connected Tools

    Here's where you'll find legacy DivX Connected installer downloads.

    DivX Connected Downloads

    DivX Connected on DivX.com
    DivX Connected Community on DivX Labs

    connected logo
    DivX Connected™ Server 1.5.1 Build 20 Production
    This is the latest production build of the DivX Connected server with Connected PC.
    DivX Connected™ Server 1.5.1 Build 20 Beta
    Installing this beta version will result in future beta updates being issued through auto-update.
    DivX Connected™ Server Plug-in SDK
    Instructions and examples around making your own DivX Connected plug-ins and themes.
    DivX Connected™ Server - Previous Versions
    It is recommended that you completely uninstall newer versions before rolling back to a previous build.

    DivX Converter CLI Mode

    Not a fan of using a GUI for your encoding? Or like to work strictly with command line prompts and terminals? Well, this post is for you. Starting with DivX 10.1.1 we added Command Line support to DivX Engine, the same engine that powers DivX Converter for media content transcoding.

    Available on Windows and Mac, DivXEngine can be used for any existing profiles or presets, including HEVC.

    Using DivXEngine

    On Windows: locate DivXEngine.exe in “C:\Program Files (x86)\DivX\DivX Transcode Engine”

    On Mac: locate DivXEngine.exe in “/Library/Application Support/DivX/DivXEngineBundle.bundle/Contents/MacOS”

    Note: Converter’s CLI, same as the GUI, will always output streams in a container (.avi, .mkv, .mp4). If you are looking to output raw HEVC bitstreams, be sure to check out our DivX HEVC Community Encoder, which outputs bitstreams. Raw bitstreams can be used with Converter or other mux tools such as MKVToolnix.

    Example Usage

    1. Transcoding to HEVC 4K profile:
      DivXEngine.exe -i "c:\testclips\test_avc.mkv" -o "c:\testclips\test_hevc.mkv" -p hevc4K

    2. Transcoding DVD to PLUS HD profile:
      DivXEngine.exe -i "c:\DVD\VIDEO_TS\VTS_01_0.IFO" -o " c:\testclips\VTS_01_0.mkv" -p phd

      Or you also can use one of the VOB files. In any case if IFO file presented all DVD will be transcoded.
      DivXEngine.exe -i "c:\DVD\VIDEO_TS\VTS_01_1.VOB" -o " c:\testclips\VTS_01_0.mkv" -p phd

    3. Burn DVD subtitles in Home Theater profile:
      DivXEngine.exe -i "c:\DVD\VIDEO_TS\VTS_01_1.IFO" -o "c:\testclips\VTS_01_0.divx" -p ht –b

      Transcoding DVD with subtitles in Home Theater profile:
      DivxEngine.exe -i "c:\DVD\VIDEO_TS\VTS_01_1.IFO" -o "c:\testclips\VTS_01_0.divx" -p ht

      In the second case DVD subtitles will be converter to DXSB subtitle supported only in Home Theater (ht), HD 720 (hd720) and HD 1080 (hd1080) profiles.

    4. Transcoding to DivX HD 1080 with external audio and subtitles tracks:
      DivXEngine.exe -i "c:\testclips\test.mpeg" "c:\testclips\audio.ac3" -i "c:\testclips\sub.srt" -o "c:\testclips\test.divx" -p hd1080

      In this case AC3 audio will be transcoded to MP3 format and srt converted to DXSB, since HD1080 supports only DXSB profiles.

    5. Transcoding to DivX HEVC 720 with external AC3 audio (pass through on) and subtitles tracks:
      DivXEngine.exe -i "c:\testclips\test.mpeg" "c:\testclips\audio.ac3" -i "c:\testclips\sub.srt" -o "c:\testclips\test.mkv" -p hevc720 -t

      In this case external AC3 audio track will be muxed into output mkv file without any changes. And since mkv supports srt subtitles “sub.srt” also will be added into a file without any changes.

    Options

    Type DivXEngine and press Enter. You will see help with args description.

    Flag Description
    -i Set input media file. You also can set row of input files – one main stream containing video, audio and subtitles tracks, and additional external audio and subtitles tracks. E.g.
    –i “./testclips/test.mpeg” –i “./testclips/test.ac3” –i “./testclips/test.srt”
    This argument is obligatory.
    -o Set path and name for output file.
    This argument is obligatory.
    [-v <video bitrate (kbps)>] Set video bitrate. Incompatible with -f option
    [-a <audio bitrate (kbps)>] Set audio bitrate. Incompatible with -f option
    [-x <custom resolution width>] Set custom resolution width
    [-y ] Set custom resolution height
    [-f <file size limit (Mb)>] Set file size limit (in Mb). With this option audio and video bitrates will be set automatically to get file with specified size, so it is incompatible with –v and –a options
    [-t] Enable audio pass through. It is currently working only for AC3 audio. Also working for external AC3
    [-p <output profile>] DivXEngine supports the following values:
    m – DivX Mobile profile
    ht – DivX Home Theater profile. Current profile is default and if output profile will not be specified, file will be transcoded in Home Theater profile.
    hd720 – DivX HD 720 profile
    hd1080 – DivX HD 1080 profile
    phd – DivX PlusHD profile
    p4k – DivX Plus 4K profile
    hevc720 – DivX HEVC 720 profile
    hevc1080 – DivX HEVC 1080 profile
    hevc4k – DivX HEVC 4K profile
    iphone – MP4 AVC presetfor iPhone
    ipad – MP4 AVC preset for iPad
    [-k] Enable trick-play track. Compatible with DivXPlusHD(phd) profile only and for one input media file
    [-s] Enable video 2 pass encoding. Currently working for all profiles except HEVC.
    [-d] Enable profile detector. This option allows you to detect what profile the input file supports, e.g. as a result of the following command line:
    DivxEngine.exe -d -i ".\testclip\ test.mkv"
    will
    PlusHD: true
    [-b] Enable burning subtitle. Currently not all subtitles types support burning. Burning works for SRT/SUB and DVD subtitles. DivXMobile and MP4 profiles support burning of internal only SSA/ASS subtitles
    [-l] Enable logging and specify (optionally) output directory. Without output directory all logs will be dumped in console window. Has to be used with –q argument. E.g.
    DivxEngine.exe -i "c:\testclips\test.mkv" -o "c:\testclips\test_out.mkv" -p phd -l "c:\temp" -q 1
    [-q] Set one of the following logging levels:
    DIVX_ALL_MSG = 1 (all message types)
    DIVX_CRITICAL_MSG = 2 (critical error)
    DIVX_ERROR_MSG = 4 (Error)
    DIVX_WARNING_MSG = 8 (Warning)
    DIVX_INFO_MSG = 16 (Information)
    DIVX_HEADER_MSG = 32 (Heading, usually marks start of group of related messages)
    DIVX_DEBUG_MSG = 64 (Debug message)
    DIVX_PROGRESS_MSG = 128 (Some progress)
    Has to be used with –l argument
    [-w] Disable WPP (Wavefront Partitioning Processing); this works in the case of HEVC profiles only.
    WPP is enabled by default for HEVC profiles.
    [-u <output profile>] HEVC quality level; this works in case of HEVC profiles only. The following values are supported:
    fastest
    fast
    balanced
    better
    best

    Known Issues

    DivXEngine supports much of the same functionality as DivX Converter. DivXEngine version 10.1.1 has the following known issues:
    1. It doesn’t have option to change order of audio or subtitles tracks
    2. It doesn’t have option to set audio bitrate
    3. It doesn’t have option to select audio codec
    4. It doesn’t have option to select audio tracks from input container.
    5. It doesn’t have option for video rotation
    6. You can’t save and use custom profiles
    7. DivXEngine sometimes crashes with enabled trick-play option.